MuseScore 3.4 Release Candidate

• jan 18, 2020 - 17:41

We are pleased to announce MuseScore 3.4 Release Candidate.

Windows 64-bit Windows 32-bit macOS 10.10 or higher Linux AppImage
(64-bit only)

MuseScore 3.4 Beta announcement

Single click interactions

We all know that MuseScore is powerful notation software that can do almost everything in terms of music notation. We conducted a dozen of user testing activities with the ones who never used MuseScore and found that "double click" is an interaction pattern that is absolutely hidden for newbies. Respondents could not edit slurs and hairpins to adjust their positions; they couldn't even apply elements from the palettes. Double click is rarely used in touch interfaces as well (that's why the young audience isn't familiar with the double click interaction pattern.)

We aim to improve usability and make MuseScore as easy as possible for newcomers keeping all the fine-tuning features for professionals. We are glad to introduce the single click concept designed by Martin Keary (Tantacrul). The new approach provides an easy way to edit elements with a single click and makes double click unnecessary.

Check out the new approach and let us know what you think! We are always here to listen to your feedback and support.

Telemetry

There is a separate topic dedicated to introducing Telemetry in MuseScore.

Release notes

New

  • Add middle adjustment handle for beams, for moving whole beam vertically
  • Add command-line option for transposing scores

Improvements

  • Embed Tremolo Bar editor to the inspector

Fixes

  • MuseScore crashed when changing the duration of a triplet's rest
  • Images attached to rests weren't imported from MuseScore 2
  • Tremolo Bar dialog had multiple UX issues
  • AppImage: system printers weren't available in the print dialog

A full list of changes is available here.


Comments

In reply to by BSG

It ensures that the plugin menu path is given a unique internal name; so telemetry can pick up on how often the plugin is invoked using the menu.
It doesn't track plugin launches using a shortcut; nor does it track interactions within the plugin (for example for docked entries).

In reply to by jeetee

I hope the telemetry doesn't make the plugins slower for users not knowledgeble enough to disable it. Shortcuts for plugins is an extremely powerful and useful feature; it sounds like Telemetry is going to seriously underreport the usage of plugins used frequently enough to merit shortcuts, i.e., foster the exact wrong conclusion.

In reply to by Marc Sabatella

This is very, very hard to believe. Isn't the purpose of the telemetry to draw conclusions about usage? What conclusion should you draw from a low usage-count on a plugin? If you count only from-menu invocations, I do not use my rednote plugin at all. In reality, I sometimes use it hundreds of times a day. This is "highly unusual" reasoning" AFAICT. "The IRS reports that very few people cheat on their taxes."

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