Can anyone translate Italian notation comments?

• Feb 7, 2020 - 01:29

Hello, friends.

Attached is a screenshot of a portion of "Time to Say Goodbye" from Wikifonia. Apparently the engraver copied the original Italian text, as well as the music, but I came across the expression "per la coda" and could not quite figure it out. See the screenshot below. Anyone know the exact translation? Is it their way of saying "to Coda" according to more modern notation practice, or what?

Attachment Size
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Comments

Coda means "tail" or end. Per la coda is "by the tail". Never seen it before but without seeing the rest of the score, I'd say it's a way to say "go to coda".
Or maybe grab your cat per la coda :-)

In reply to by BFI221

I would then like to understand why, in a terminology of Italian derivation To Coda is not translated into Al Coda.

20020701.png

A sort of exception compared to D.C. (Da Capo), Fine, D.C. al Coda etc.
Maybe there's a technical reason I don't know about.

In reply to by Shoichi

Probably because so much of what we use now is some combination of Italian, French, and German. Same with most musical terminology. Spend some time in old French symphony scores and things sort of look familiar, at least enough to where you can figure it out. Even instrument names.
Even English is different now than it was 100 years ago. And then there's English in the US and English in England. Some words mean totally the opposite.

In reply to by Shoichi

Only the Tool Tip for those is translatable. "To Coda" seems more commen in English, but "Al Code" apparenyly known/used too, so I guess this should better get changed to the Italian term, or made translatable (not sure that is possible at all though)

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